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Cancer Research: Rationale for the design of an oncology trial using a generic targeted therapy multi‑drug regimen for NSCLC patients without treatment options (Review).


http:  www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov corehtml pmc pmcgifs pubmed pmc Cancer Research: Rationale for the design of an oncology trial using a generic targeted therapy multi‑drug regimen for NSCLC patients without treatment options (Review). Related Articles

Rationale for the design of an oncology trial using a generic targeted therapy multi‑drug regimen for NSCLC patients without treatment options (Review).

Oncol Rep. 2013 Oct;30(4):1535-41

Authors: Langhammer S

Abstract
Despite more than 70 years of research concerning medication for cancer treatment, the disease still remains one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Many cancer types lead to death within a period of months to years. The original class of chemotherapeutics is not selective for tumor cells and often has limited efficacy, while treated patients suffer from adverse side‑effects. To date, the concept of tumor‑specific targeted therapy drugs has not fulfilled its expectation to provide a key for a cure. Today, many oncology trials are designed using a combination of chemotherapeutics with targeted therapy drugs. However, these approaches have limited outcomes in most cancer indications. This perspective review provides a rationale to combine targeted therapy drugs for cancer treatment based on observations of evolutionary principles of tumor development and HIV infections. In both diseases, the mechanisms of immune evasion and drug resistance can be compared to some extent. However, only for HIV is a breakthrough treatment available, which is the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The principles of HAART and recent findings from cancer research were employed to construct a hypothetical model for cancer treatment with a multi‑drug regimen of targeted therapy drugs. As an example of this hypothesis, it is proposed to combine already marketed targeted therapy drugs against VEGFRs, EGFR, CXCR4 and COX2 in an oncology trial for non‑small cell lung cancer patients without further treatment options.

PMID: 23877481 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

pubmed: clinical cancer rese…

Cancer Research: Phase II clinical study on the GEMOX regimen as second- line therapy for advanced ovarian cancer.


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Phase II clinical study on the GEMOX regimen as second- line therapy for advanced ovarian cancer.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2013;14(6):3949-53

Authors: Yuan SF, Zhang LP, Zhu LJ, Chen WJ, Zheng WE, Xiong JP

Abstract
AIM: To investigate the effectiveness and adverse effects of gemcitabine by fixed-dose rate infusion plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen) as second-line therapy for advanced ovarian cancer.
METHODS: 64 patients with advanced ovarian cancer were divided into an experimental group (44 cases) and a control group (20 cases). The experimental group was treated with continuous intravenous infusion of gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m(2) with a fixed-dose rate of 10 mg/m(2)/min, on days 1 and 8 and oxaliplatin at 100 mg/m(2) on day 1, IVGTT, repeated every 3 weeks. The control group was treated with intravenous infusion of gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m(2) within 30 min on days 1 and and oxaliplatin at 100 mg/m(2) on day 1, IVGTT, again repeated every 3 weeks. CT scans or MRI were used for review every 1-2 cycles.
RESULTS: The effective rate in the experimental group was significantly high than control group (43.2% vs 35.0%; P < 0.05), with no obvious difference of hematologic or non-hematologic toxicity between the two groups (P > 0.05).
CONCLUSION: GEMOX regimen is very effective to treat advanced ovarian cancer, with low toxicity, good tolerance and improved life quality in patients.

PMID: 23886213 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

pubmed: clinical cancer rese…

Cancer Research: Incidence of hand-foot syndrome with capecitabine in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment in patients with advanced and/or metastatic gastric cancer suitable for treatment with a fluoropyrimidine-based regimen.


http:  production.springer.de OnlineResources Logos springerlink Cancer Research: Incidence of hand foot syndrome with capecitabine in combination with chemotherapy as first line treatment in patients with advanced and/or metastatic gastric cancer suitable for treatment with a fluoropyrimidine based regimen. Related Articles

Incidence of hand-foot syndrome with capecitabine in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment in patients with advanced and/or metastatic gastric cancer suitable for treatment with a fluoropyrimidine-based regimen.

Clin Transl Oncol. 2012 Sep;14(9):689-97

Authors: Gómez-Martin C, Sánchez A, Irigoyen A, Llorente B, Pérez B, Serrano R, Safont MJ, Falcó E, Lacasta A, Reboredo M, Aparicio J, Dueñas R, Muñoz ML, Regueiro P, Sanchez-Viñes E, López RL

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Hand-foot syndrome (HFS) is a limiting toxicity of capecitabine, which is not life-threatening but could compromise capecitabine efficacy.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: This phase II, multicenter, non-controlled study assessed the safety, particularly grade three HFS incidence, and efficacy of four capecitabine-based chemotherapy regimens [cisplatin/capecitabine (CX), epirubicin/cisplatin/capecitabine (ECX), epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (EOX) and docetaxel/cisplatin/capecitabine (DCX)] as first-line treatment for advanced and/or metastatic gastric cancer.
RESULTS: One hundred and eight patients were assigned to one of the four treatment groups, according to investigator’s criteria, and grouped together for both safety and efficacy primary analyses. HFS was reported in 31 patients (19.6%) and its first presentation occurred at a median of 72 days (range 19-209 days). Grade 3 HFS developed in 6.3, 5.2, 3.7 and 2.4%, of patients receiving ECX, DCX, EOX or CX chemotherapy regimen, respectively. Capecitabine dose reduction/discontinuation due to HFS was required in 5.7% of patients (9/158). The most common (> 10%) grade 3-4 treatment-related AEs were neutropenia (15.2%), asthenia (12.0%) and diarrhoea (11.4%).
CONCLUSIONS: A moderate incidence of HFS was reported in patients treated with capecitabine, which generally presented late and required dose reduction in < 1/3 of patients. The results suggest that capecitabine may be useful in combination with standard fluorouracil-based regimens in patients with advanced and/or metastatic gastric cancer with favourable safety profile.

PMID: 22855151 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

pubmed: clinical cancer rese…